LIDA102 Social media, online identity and learning

lida102
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#1

Join the discussion on social media, online identity and learning sharing your personal views. Choose one or more of the following questions as a catalyst for your contributions to the forum:

  • How much of what you learn should be open and transparent (i.e. public) and how much should be kept private. Why?
  • In a digital age, how important is it for you to build a digital footprint of your learning?
  • What are the challenges and opportunities for building your online identity?
  • What levels of online engagement do you feel are appropriate for your own learning on this course? Does this differ from your engagement in other online communities?
  • Please “Like”, share and reply to posts. These are forms of engagement and a contribution to your online learning identity.
  • Other?

#2

Any public tracking of my online learning is for me, usually because the online tools are better for searching and connecting than offline. I participate in loads of online learning - anything that sounds interesting, although my participation varies widely. It all depends …


#3

Hi @vtaylor

What I like about open online learning is the ability to sip and dip in the things I find interesting.

I do get frustrated when so-called “open” courses require password registration in order to take a look at learning materials. This forces a prospective learner / interested person to leave a digital footprint of courses they have accessed. I can imagine situations where an individual would like to retain anonymity when deciding if an open course would be of interest.


#4

Worse than having to register for access to an open course are the ones that require completion of a gatekeeper “test” to access the next module. I’m never that interested.

The article about lurkers was interesting. I find it odd that they are so concerned about trying to get peripheral learners to be more visibly present in the open courses.


#5

Agreed - there is much to be learned through reflective observation. We know from our data that a high percentage of OERu learners actually read the contributions of others who post even though they are not visibly present in the courses.